Aus aller Welt: Was Kinder pro Woche essen

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Gregg Segal ist ausgezogen, um Ernährungsgewohnheiten aus aller Welt zu dokumentieren. Das Ergebnis ist inzwischen als Bildband unter dem Titel „Daily Bread: What Kids Eat Around the World“ erschienen. Für das Projekt hat der Fotograf Kinder gebeten, eine Woche lang Tagebuch über ihre Mahlzeiten zu führen. Alles, was die Kids aufgezeichnet haben, wurde anschließend nachgekauft und um sie herum in Szene gesetzt. Danach haben sie es sich hoffentlich gut schmecken lassen.

Wie sehr die Geschmäcker auseinander gehen, lässt sich anhand der Länder von Malaysia über Deutschland und Brasilien bis hin zu den USA gut nachvollziehen. Insgesamt lassen sich 52 Kids auf die Teller schauen. Wir haben eine kleine Auswahl getroffen. Als Kontrastprogramm dazu gibt es eine weitere Bilderserie von Gregg Segal, für die Familien den Müll einer ganzen Woche gesammelt und zur Schau gestellt haben. Passenderweise trägt dieses Projekt den Titel „7 Days of Garbage“.

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One more from Brazil. Ayme has been raised on a mostly indigenous diet. Her dad is a forest engineer and nutritionist and her mom @anaboquadi researches the culinary and medicinal uses of foods from the Cerrado – and has a great little vegan restaurant, Buriti Zen in Brasilia (for all you locals). Try the walnut cassava moqueca and cauliflower soufflé with cupuaçu cream. Ayme’s earliest memory of food is her mama’s milk. Thinking of this makes her want to return to that time and nurse again. Açaí is Ayme’s favorite food and part of her heritage; her great grandmother was an açaí merchant who sold her berries at Ver-o-peso Market in Belém. From working on Daily Bread, Ayme realized that she eats many things that other kids don’t – like lots of fresh veggies. #dailybread #powerhousebooks #plantprotein #whatkidseat #culture #kids #eatyourgreens #diet #indigenous #buriti #buritizen

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Thayla, Brasilia, 2018. Most poor kids in Brasil attend school to be able to eat, but the government has failed to provide adequate school lunches, offering little more than milk and crackers or canned beans. Thayla wishes she had more flavors in her diet and could afford to eat feijoada. If she had enough money, she’d buy clothes for the street kids who are worse off than her. Someday, she’d like to be a teacher. In Brazil, corporate food is finding ways to profit from the poorest consumers, reaching ever more remote places. Nestle hires micro-entrepreneurs, mom and pops who trundle thru villages with carts selling cheap processed snacks. A generation ago, Brazil’s poor were underfed. Today, 50% of the population is overweight. The UN should be focused not only at calorie intake but nutrient. #dailybread #powerhousebooks #whatkidseat #diet #nutrition #kids #brazil #schoollunch

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Can you guess what percent of our calories come from vegetables in the US? Less than 1%! Looking at all of the kids’ food I photographed, not just in the US, but all over the world, greens were consistently absent. Parents often say, “My kid won’t eat vegetables.” They throw up their hands. “I put healthy food in front of them, but they only like pizza.” You can’t force kids to eat healthy foods, but if you give them the choice, they’ll choose salt, fat, and sugar over leafy greens because salt, fat, and sugar appeal to our deepest, primal cravings stretching back to our caveman days! If you don’t introduce whipped cream Frappuccinos, sautéed spinach with a little butter and salt isn’t bad. #dailybread #eatyourgreens #whatkidseat #parenting #primalcravings #diet #powerhousebooks

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Prince, photographed in 2016 for Daily Bread. When he was 12, Prince and his family left St. James Montego Bay for the U.S. His parents decided life in Jamaica was too dangerous after Prince’s cousin was gunned down at the little neighborhood market his family owned. Prince misses the green open space of his family farm and the animals they raised: goats, chickens, geese, rabbits, pigs and cows. They grew and harvested corn, yams, coconut, oranges, apples, pears, ackee and breadfruit – and back then his diet was much better than it is now. Prince misses his dad, too, who’s stuck in Montego Bay driving a cab. He prays he’ll get his papers and come to America. #dailybread #powerhousebooks #culture #americandream #whatkidseat #diet #foodaroundtheworld #jamaicanculture

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Jesus, photographed in 2016 for Daily Bread. Jesus was raised by his mom, who was a teenager when she left her family and home in Michoacán, Mexico and made her way to Los Angeles. Jesus, his mom and his 2 older sisters shared a one-bedroom apartment south of downtown infested with roaches and rodents. Jesus saw little of his dad whom they discovered had another family. The only meal Jesus ate most days was dinner. His 1 hour commute to school didn’t leave time for breakfast and the school lunch was so unappetizing, a piece of fruit was all he could stomach. Mom made chicken and rice most nights. On special occasions she’d make Jesus’ favorite: tamales with red chile sauce. Growing up, Jesus was aware there were people worse off than him. He joined a student organization to feed the homeless and volunteered with @peaceoverviolence a non-profit helping victims of domestic abuse. Jesus just finished his sophomore year @harvard, with a double major of applied mathematics and psychology. Jesus has had more opportunities than he could ever have imagined, though knows there are obstacles ahead. @Erin cc2la thank you. #dailybread #whatkidseat #schoollunch #mom #successstory #proud #humbling

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