Matthew Quick fragt sich, was Kunstgeschichte noch wert ist

Matthew Quick fragt sich, was Kunstgeschichte noch wert ist 1
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Seit Jahrtausenden schaffen Menschen Kunstwerke. Um viele davon kümmern wir uns fürsorglich, andere verfallen vor unseren Augen. Und wieder andere werden von Banausen aus ideologischen Gründen zerstört. Der Australier Matthew Quick hat sich viele Gedanken über unseren Umgang mit Kunst gemacht – und dann die Reihe „Monumental Nobodies“ geschaffen. Die zeigt bekannte Denkmäler, die mit menschlichen Objekten „geschmückt“ sind.

„He travels frequently, has resided variously in the UK, Portugal & Malaysia, and once lived underneath a grand piano in Greenwich. He has spent nights under stars in India, under surveillance in Burma, under ground in Bolivia and under nourished in London. His scariest moment was having machine-gun shoved in his face during anti-monarchy riots in Nepal, although crashing a para-glider into a forest was also something of a highlight.“

Ein Reiterdenkmal mit Überwachungskameras, die Queen of England mit einer Wäscheleine um den Hals, der griechische Meeresgott Neptun mit Schwimmflügeln – Quick macht wirklich vor keiner Epoche halt. Er fragt sich: Warum muss Kunst immer wieder das Opfer sein? Und welchen Wert hat Kunstgeschichte überhaupt noch, wenn manche Menschen so achtlos mit den Werken der Vergangenheit umgehen? Laut „Business Review Weekly“ zählt Quick zu den 50 wichtigsten Künstlern Australiens. Seit 2006 wurde er mit zahlreichen Preisen ausgezeichnet oder zumindest für sie nominiert, etwa ebenso lange sind seine Werke in Ausstellungen in ganz Australien zu sehen. Bevor er sich in Vollzeit der Kunst gewidmet hat, arbeitete er unter anderem als Verkäufer und Innenarchitekt.

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A Fine Romance I am absolutely thrilled to be a part of this new museum exhibition. Quality conceptual realism has been something of a phenomenon in Australia, remarkable for a number of reasons: firstly the skills of artists are just extraordinary, plus they all developed independently of one another at approximately the same time, and the fact that thought-provoking painting has re-emerged again after decades of being “unfashionable” with curators. While recognised by the commercial galleries, this is the first museum show that moves towards recognising this phenomenon. A Fine Romance is an exhibition about beauty and deceit. Featuring hyper-real paintings and sculptures by a range of contemporary artists, it is as seductive as it is awe-inspiring. Drawing on the Gallery’s collection, together with dazzling artworks sourced from behind the closed doors of private collectors, A Fine Romance has a line-up that represents a who’s-who of Australian realism, including @natashabieniek, @robineleyartist, @louisefeneley, @juan_ford_art, @samjinksart, @samleach_00, @matt_r_martin, @shannon.smiley.artist, @heidi_yardley , and @michaelzavros. Exhibition is on at Gippsland Art Gallery, 70 Foster Street, Sale 2850It opens 8 December 2018 and ends 17 February 2019

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Crowning Glory 120x100cm Oil on Italian Linen Nillumbik Art Prize 2013 Kilgour Art Prize 2014 — There is corner of a foreign field that is forever England. Well, just. The drivers choked back along Burmah Rd don't see it, don't care. They just want the lights to go green. But mouldering in the Penang heat behind a row of overhanging trees lies the Queen Victoria Memorial Statue. In 1930 this already long-dead monarch was enshrined by “The Queen’s Chinese”, who despite having fled China as a consequence of her policies, somehow felt the need to prove themselves loyal subjects. It was a colonial version of Stockholm Syndrome. Their objectification of her as the embodiment of Empire was not unique. Eleven years later the occupying Japanese forces ordered her complete subjugation: The lions around the plinth had their Union Jack shields cut off, the body was concealed behind advertising hoardings and the Imperial Japanese flag was flown from her head. Maybe they needn't have bothered. More efficiently than any of the clumsy Japanese efforts, contemporary Penang has swept away all vestiges of colonialism – simply by ignoring her. Dwarfed by a basketball court that abuts the plinth, she has been forgotten by all, save the mad dogs and Australians, out in the midday sun.

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@metro_gallery is showing my latest solo show exhibition, open Monday to Saturday until September 3. You won't regret it. HISTORY IS WRITTEN BY THE VICTORS oil on linen She was just ten years old before being rendered irrelevant. At almost double the height of the Statue of Liberty, Mother of the Motherland was unveiled in Kiev by Brezhnev in 1981, only a decade before the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union voted itself into extinction. Originally twin statues of Lenin and Stalin, each nearly 200 metres tall, were planned for the site. Instead they spent nearly 9 million rouble on her. With the Soviet economy already deeply stressed, she was controversial from the outset. And current financial shortages mean the “eternal” flame at its base – which consumes 400 cubic metres of gas per hour – is no longer eternal. Nowadays it is burned only on the biggest national holidays. Like the monuments of antiquity, it may only be a matter of time before the prevailing political creed decides she be “repurposed” for another use, or scrapped altogether. #matthewquick #juxtapoz #recyclegroup #hifructose #beautifulbizarre #Art_Spotlight #contemporaryart #paint #painting #collectable_art #srartwork #aartistic_dreamers #artistdrop #keinmagazine #smashthemag #londonstreetart #artist_features #designiskinky #newcontemporary #aureta #blackappleart #talnts #thejealouscurator #artFido #Art_Spotlight #lovewatts #paintguide #bestreet #newcontemporary #artbankau

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